Alzheimer's and Related Dementia Resources for Professionals (2023)

Get Tools and Training for Your Practice

Access free clinical practice tools, training materials and more resources for physicians, nurses, social workers and other professionals.

  • Cognitive Screening Tests
  • Tools for Assessment, Diagnosis, and Management
  • Professional Training and Curricula
  • Patient Care
  • Clinical Trials and Studies
  • Patient and Caregiver Education

Cognitive Screening Tests

Screening tools are designed to detect early cognitive changes and are an important first step in assessing cognitive impairment. If tests indicate possible impairment, then further evaluations are warranted. The following are examples of cognitive screening tests that are available to the public.

NIA does not endorse specific screening tools. The selection of screening tool depends on a variety of factors, including the setting, target population age and demographics, language, expertise of the administrator, etc. Research is currently underway to create and validate new tools for cognitive screening in primary care settings.

Mini-Cog (PDF, 86K)
The Mini-Cog is a three-minute instrument that consists of two components: a three-item recall test for memory and a clock drawing test. It is designed as a patient screening tool and is available in many languages.

Short Informant Questionnaire on Cognitive Decline in the Elderly (PDF, 1.9M)
The IQCODE asks informants, such as spouses, relatives or another person close to the patient, about changes in cognition and function in 16 areas.

(Video) Best Caregiver Resources for Alzheimer's and Dementia | Seniorly

AD8 Dementia Screening Interview
This screening test is designed as an informant screening tool, but may be administered to the patient. It consists of eight questions about changes in the person’s thinking, memory and behavior. This screening tool is available in English and Spanish.

Quick Dementia Rating System (PDF, 239KB)
The QDRS is designed as an informant screening tool, but may be administered to the patient. Respondents are asked to rate change in the patient in 10 categories that cover cognitive and functional abilities.

NIH Toolbox®
This comprehensive set of measurements to quickly assess cognitive, emotional, sensory, and motor functions can be used on an iPad.

UCSF Brain Health Assessment
This 10-minute assessment, developed by researchers at the University of California San Francisco, evaluates memory, executive/speed, visuospatial and language skills. An optional three-minute informant survey is also available to provide information about functional impairment and behavioral changes.

ACT on Alzheimer’s Provider Practice Tools
Decision support tools for screening, diagnosis and disease management, developed by a Minnesota group of health, government and nonprofit organizations.

Alzheimer’s Disease Diagnostic Guidelines
Get detailed information about the National Institute on Aging/Alzheimer’s Association Diagnostic Guidelines for Alzheimer’s Disease.

Assessing Cognitive Impairment in Older Patients
Get practical information and tips for assessing patients with memory loss or other signs of cognitive impairment.

Assessment of Cognitive Complaints Toolkit for Alzheimer’s Disease
Developed by the California Alzheimer’s Disease Centers, a statewide network of 10 dementia care Centers of Excellence, this toolkit provides primary care providers with the tools necessary to recognize normal cognition, diagnose Alzheimer’s disease and identify other cognitive problems requiring specialty referral.

(Video) Understanding Alzheimer's and Types of Dementia - Professional Caregiver Webinar

CMS Cognitive Assessment & Care Plan Services
This webpage by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) provides information on cognitive assessment and care plan services (code 99483), including what it covers and how to bill for it. CMS also created a relatededucational video for health care providers.

Cognitive Impairment Care Planning Toolkit
This toolkit from the Alzheimer’s Association provides recommendations and tools for using the 99483 Medicare code for cognitive assessment and care planning for patients with cognitive impairment.

Diagnosing Lewy Body Dementia
Review symptoms and guidelines for distinguishing Lewy body dementia from other dementias.

Diagnosing Frontotemporal Disorders
Get information about diagnosing frontotemporal dementia and related disorders.

DIAMOND-Lewy Assessment and Management Toolkits
Funded by the U.K.’s National Institute for Health Research, these toolkits are designed to improve the diagnosis and management of Lewy body dementia.

Guide to Billing Codes for Dementia Services (MS Word, 1.6M)
Download this guide from the National Alzheimer’s and Dementia Resource Center provides billing codes and guidance to bill third-party payers, such as fee-for-service Medicare and private insurance, for dementia care services.

KAER Toolkit: 4-Step Process to Detecting Cognitive Impairment and Earlier Diagnosis of Dementia (PDF, 6.9M)
This toolkit is focused on the KAER model developed by the Gerontological Society of America Workgroup on Cognitive Impairment Detection and Earlier Diagnosis and offers tools and resources to implement the four steps in the KAER model.

Managing Older Patients with Cognitive Impairment
Use this quick guide to develop care strategies, discuss clinical trials and make medical and family support plans for older adults with cognitive impairment.

(Video) Progress and Potential: Alzheimer's and Related Dementias Research — Diversity in Clinical Trials

Medical Care of Adults With Down Syndrome: A Clinical Guideline
Find recommendations on assessment and diagnosis of dementia in adults with Down syndrome.

Next Steps After a Diagnosis of Alzheimer’s Disease
Use this handout to refer patients to a wealth of information and resources about health care, safety and more. Available in English and Spanish.

Practice Guideline Update: Mild Cognitive Impairment
These guidelines from the American Academy of Neurology provide recommendations for clinicians concerning the assessment, diagnosis and treatment of mild cognitive impairment.

Recommendations for Operationalizing the Detection of Cognitive Impairment During the Medicare Annual Wellness Visit in a Primary Care Setting
These recommendations from an Alzheimer’s Association-convened group of experts provide primary care physicians with guidance on cognitive assessment during the Medicare annual wellness visit and when referral or further testing is needed.

Professional Training and Curricula

Training Curriculum: Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Dementias
Sixteen core modules and 11 supplemental modules developed by the Health Resources and Services Administration HRSA Bureau of Health Workforce to train the primary care workforce about dementia care, help providers address caregiver needs and help caregivers cope with the challenges of caregiving.

ACT on Alzheimer’s Dementia Curriculum
This curriculum for clinicians and professionals in many disciplines covers assessment, screening, diagnosis, treatment, caregiver support and science.

Alzheimer’s Training for Health Care Providers
This nine-module CE credit course from the University of Kentucky trains healthcare providers, especially those in medically underserved areas, in dementia diagnosis and treatment, management and related topics.

Alzheimer's Disease and Related Dementias Mini-Course
This mini-course includes four video presentations and companion slides from the University of Washington Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center. The mini-course covers healthy and unhealthy brain aging, clinical essentials of Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias, vascular brain injury and a research framework for Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias.

(Video) July 2022 Meeting of the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care, and Services | Part 1

Training for professionals is also available through voluntary and professional organizations.

Patient Care

Talking with Your Older Patient
Learn to communicate effectively with older patients. Find out how to discuss cognitive impairment, break bad news and work with families and caregivers.

The Dilemma of Delirium in Older Patients
Understand the mechanisms involved in delirium and improved ways to recognize and treat the condition.

Best Practice Caregiving Tool
This searchable database of vetted dementia care programs is designed to help healthcare and community-based organizations make informed decisions.

Clinical Trials and Studies

Dementia Research and Clinical Trials
Get information and resources for helping patients find and understand clinical trials.

Alzheimer’s and Dementia Outreach, Recruitment, and Engagement (ADORE) Resources
ADORE is a searchable collection of materials designed to support recruitment and retention into clinical trials and studies for Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias. It includes examples of Clinical Partnerships with Alzheimer’s Disease Research Centers and other materials.

Talking With Your Patients About Alzheimer's and Related Dementias Clinical Trials
Find guidance, in English and Spanish,for discussing Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias clinical research studies with your patients. Also, access resources to help them learn more about participation.

Patient and Caregiver Education

NIA Alzheimer’s and related Dementias Education and Referral Center (ADEAR)
The National Institute on Aging’s ADEAR Center offers information and free print publications about Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias for families, caregivers and health professionals. ADEAR Center staff answer telephone, email and written requests and make referrals to local and national resources.

(Video) Progress and Potential: Alzheimer's and Related Dementias Research — Genetics

Video: How Alzheimer’s Changes the Brain
This four-minute video shows how Alzheimer’s affects the human brain and looks at promising ideas to treat and prevent the disease.

Alzheimers.gov
Find information andresources from federal government agencies for people with dementia, caregivers, families, and professionals. Available in English and Spanish,

Content reviewed: November 5, 2021.

FAQs

How do professionals support people with dementia? ›

Some people with dementia find this confusing, but these professionals provide important support.
...
General practitioners (GPs)
  • talk to you about your dementia and any other medical problems.
  • carry out a physical examination.
  • arrange further tests.
  • review any treatments you're receiving.

What resources are available for dementia patients? ›

Here are some places that can give you support and advice:
  • NIA Alzheimer's and Related Dementias Education and Referral (ADEAR) Center. ...
  • Alzheimers.gov. ...
  • Alzheimer's Association. ...
  • Alzheimer's Foundation of America. ...
  • Eldercare Locator. ...
  • National Institute on Aging Information Center.

What resources are available on the Internet for Alzheimer caregivers? ›

10 of the best free resources for dementia caregivers
  • Dementia Support Groups. ...
  • The Alzheimer's Association's 24/7 Helpline. ...
  • Family Caregiver Alliance – Dementia Caregiver Resources. ...
  • The National Alliance for Caregiving – Brain Health Conversation Guide. ...
  • U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs – Dementia Care.
10 Jan 2020

What resources programs are provided by the Alzheimer's Association? ›

Find answers, local resources and support through one of our Online Tools.
  • Alzheimer's Navigator®
  • Alz Connected®
  • Community Resource Finder.
  • Online Training and Education Center.
  • essentiaALZ® Certification.
  • TrialMatch®
  • Virtual Library.

What services are there to support people who are caring for someone with dementia? ›

Ask for help

Charities and voluntary organisations provide valuable support and advice on their websites and via their helplines: Alzheimer's Society's Dementia Connect support line on 0333 150 3456. Age UK Advice Line on 0800 678 1602 (free) Independent Age Helpline on 0800 319 6789 (free)

What are 4 features of person Centred care for clients with dementia? ›

In clinical practice, PCC includes incorporating personal knowledge of the person with dementia, conducting meaningful activities, making well-being a priority, and improving the quality of the relationships between the health care provider and the individual with dementia.

What are 5 strategies you should use to communicate with people with dementia? ›

Tips for successful communication:
  • Engage the person in one-on-one conversation in a quiet space that has minimal distractions.
  • Speak slowly and clearly.
  • Maintain eye contact. ...
  • Give the person plenty of time to respond so he or she can think about what to say.
  • Be patient and offer reassurance. ...
  • Ask one question at a time.

What is the difference between Alzheimer's and dementia? ›

While dementia is a general term, Alzheimer's disease is a specific brain disease. It is marked by symptoms of dementia that gradually get worse over time. Alzheimer's disease first affects the part of the brain associated with learning, so early symptoms often include changes in memory, thinking and reasoning skills.

What help do Alzheimer's patients need? ›

Advertisement
  • Schedule wisely. Establish a daily routine. ...
  • Take your time. Anticipate that tasks may take longer than they used to and schedule more time for them. ...
  • Involve the person. ...
  • Provide choices. ...
  • Provide simple instructions. ...
  • Limit napping. ...
  • Reduce distractions.

What are the 6 stages of dementia? ›

FAQs about the stages of dementia

People experiencing dementia will go through the following stages in regards to the need for dementia care: Stage 1: Independence, Stage 2: Uncertainty, Stage 3: Follow the leader, Stage 4: Clinginess, or clingy dementia, Stage 5: Overnight care, and Stage 6: Fulltime care.

How can you help someone with Alzheimer's or dementia? ›

10 Ways to Help a Family Living with Alzheimer's
  1. Educate yourself about Alzheimer's disease. ...
  2. Stay in touch. ...
  3. Be patient. ...
  4. Offer a shoulder to lean on. ...
  5. Engage the person with dementia in conversation. ...
  6. Offer to help the family with its to-do list. ...
  7. Engage family members in activities. ...
  8. Offer family members a reprieve.

What stage of dementia is forgetting family members? ›

Stage 6. In stage 6 of dementia, a person may start forgetting the names of close loved ones and have little memory of recent events. Communication is severely disabled and delusions, compulsions, anxiety, and agitation may occur.

What is the name of a support organization for people who have Alzheimer's? ›

Formed in 1980, the Alzheimer's Association is the leading voluntary health organization in Alzheimer's care, support and research.

What are 3 components of assisting the Alzheimer's resident with communication? ›

To speak effectively with a person who has Alzheimer's: Offer simple, step-by-step instructions. Repeat instructions and allow more time for a response. Try not to interrupt.

What is the best organization for Alzheimer's research? ›

The Alzheimer's Association is likely the charity you're most familiar with if you're involved with Alzheimer's disease awareness. It's the largest nonprofit organization dedicated to this cause.

What is the best Alzheimer's organization? ›

Perhaps the most well-known organization for dementia donations, the Alzheimer's Association was founded in 1980 by caregivers and others who wanted to support people with the disease while advancing research.

How do social workers help dementia patients? ›

Social care workers can help with personal care such as washing, dressing, changing bedding, doing laundry and helping with meals. They work in your own home as well as in residential care homes. You may need a social care worker at home because you have just come out of hospital and are recovering.

Where can help and support for people with dementia and their families be found? ›

Get support and advice

Call our Dementia Helpline for free on 0800 888 6678 for support from our dementia specialist Admiral Nurses. The Helpline is open from 9am to 9pm Monday to Friday and 9am to 5pm on Saturday to Sunday.

What are the 6 C's of person-centred care? ›

So, the 6Cs are care, compassion, competence, communication, courage and commitment. Let us have a look at each one individually.

What sensation is most important to clients with dementia? ›

Vision is perhaps our most important sense, the one through which we gain most of our information…. (Read more >>) Hearing (Auditory Stimulation) – Our ears probably provides us with our second most vibrant source of sensory stimulation. (Read more >>)

What are three challenges caregivers face when caring for dementia patients? ›

Respondents identified their biggest Alzheimer's caregiver challenges as:
  • Dealing with memory loss and impact of the disease on your loved one (25%)
  • Handling the stress and emotional toll on self (16%)
  • Having patience with your loved one (15%)
  • Handling loved one's mood swings or behavior changes (12%)
21 Nov 2018

What 3 skills are most essential for dealing with clients who have dementia? ›

'Empathy and time to talk, tactile skills, patience and kindness are the real skills which work,' adds Mr Makin. Mental health nurses work with relatives as well as a team of professionals to plan care for a resident with dementia.

What should you not say to someone with Alzheimer's? ›

I'm going to discuss five of the most basic ones here: 1) Don't tell them they are wrong about something, 2) Don't argue with them, 3) Don't ask if they remember something, 4) Don't remind them that their spouse, parent or other loved one is dead, and 5) Don't bring up topics that may upset them.

What types of questions should you avoid when talking to someone with dementia? ›

“Avoid asking questions that make a person feel like they are taking a test,” says Drew. “These questions can feel disrespectful and provoke anxiety, and they simply aren't helpful. Questions should be for the purpose of connecting, giving people a voice, and finding out what they want and need.”

Is dementia genetic or hereditary? ›

Many people affected by dementia are concerned that they may inherit or pass on dementia. The majority of dementia is not inherited by children and grandchildren. In rarer types of dementia there may be a strong genetic link, but these are only a tiny proportion of overall cases of dementia.

What is the life expectancy of someone with dementia? ›

The average life expectancy figures for the most common types of dementia are as follows: Alzheimer's disease – around eight to 10 years. Life expectancy is less if the person is diagnosed in their 80s or 90s. A few people with Alzheimer's live for longer, sometimes for 15 or even 20 years.

Is Alzheimer's hereditary? ›

Is Alzheimer's Genetic? Family history is not necessary for an individual to develop Alzheimer's. However, research shows that those who have a parent or sibling with Alzheimer's are more likely to develop the disease than those who do not have a first-degree relative with Alzheimer's.

How do you make a dementia patient happy? ›

Do something personal.
  1. Give the person a hand massage with lotion.
  2. Brush his or her hair.
  3. Give the person a manicure.
  4. Take photos of the person and make a collage.
  5. Encourage the person to talk more about subjects they enjoy.
  6. Make a family tree posterboard.

What are the 5 stages of Alzheimer's? ›

There are five stages associated with Alzheimer's disease: preclinical Alzheimer's disease, mild cognitive impairment due to Alzheimer's disease, mild dementia due to Alzheimer's disease, moderate dementia due to Alzheimer's disease and severe dementia due to Alzheimer's disease.

What is the most common cause of death in dementia patients? ›

One of the most common causes of death for people with dementia is pneumonia caused by an infection. A person in the later stages of dementia may have symptoms that suggest that they are close to death, but can sometimes live with these symptoms for many months.

What are signs that dementia is getting worse? ›

increasing confusion or poor judgment. greater memory loss, including a loss of events in the more distant past. needing assistance with tasks, such as getting dressed, bathing, and grooming. significant personality and behavior changes, often caused by agitation and unfounded suspicion.

Which stage of dementia lasts longest? ›

Middle-stage Alzheimer's (moderate)

Middle-stage Alzheimer's is typically the longest stage and can last for many years.

What are 3 types of behavioral triggers Alzheimer's? ›

Generally, people with dementia become agitated due to three potential trigger categories: Medical, physiological and/or environmental.

What makes Alzheimer's patients happy? ›

"Frequent visits and social interactions, exercise, music, dance, jokes, and serving patients their favorite foods are all simple things that can have a lasting emotional impact on a patient's quality of life and subjective well-being."

What therapy is best for dementia? ›

Cognitive stimulation therapy

It is currently the only psychological dementia treatment directly recommended by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) to help people with mild or moderate dementia.

What stage of dementia is not bathing? ›

Dementia stage 5: moderately severe cognitive decline

At this point, a person may no longer be able to carry out normal activities of daily living (ADLs), such as dressing or bathing, without some caregiver assistance.

What stage of dementia does Sundowning start? ›

This may continue into the night, making it hard for them to get enough sleep. This is sometimes known as 'sundowning' but is not necessarily linked to the sun setting or limited to the end of the day. Sundowning can happen at any stage of dementia but is more common during the middle stage and later stages.

What causes dementia patients to suddenly get worse? ›

other long-term health problems – dementia tends to progress more quickly if the person is living with other conditions, such as heart disease, diabetes or high blood pressure, particularly if these are not well-managed.

What are 5 strategies you should use to communicate with people with dementia? ›

Tips for successful communication:
  • Engage the person in one-on-one conversation in a quiet space that has minimal distractions.
  • Speak slowly and clearly.
  • Maintain eye contact. ...
  • Give the person plenty of time to respond so he or she can think about what to say.
  • Be patient and offer reassurance. ...
  • Ask one question at a time.

What are 4 features of person Centred care for clients with dementia? ›

In clinical practice, PCC includes incorporating personal knowledge of the person with dementia, conducting meaningful activities, making well-being a priority, and improving the quality of the relationships between the health care provider and the individual with dementia.

What resources are available to assist the family of a patient with Alzheimer's disease? ›

Here are some places that can give you support and advice:
  • NIA Alzheimer's and Related Dementias Education and Referral (ADEAR) Center. Email the ADEAR Center. ...
  • Alzheimer's Association. Phone: 1-800-272-3900.
  • Alzheimer's Foundation of America. Phone: 1-866-232-8484.
  • National Institute on Aging Information Center.

What type of doctor is best for Alzheimer's patients? ›

Neurologist and Neuropsychologists

A neurologist is a medical doctor who specializes in diagnosing, treating, and managing disorders of the brain and nervous system, such as epilepsy, migraine, stroke, Parkinson's disease, and Alzheimer's disease.

What type of specialist might see a patient with Alzheimer's disease? ›

Neurologist. Neurologists are physicians who focus on abnormalities of the brain and central nervous system. They can conduct in-depth neurological examinations. Neurologists use brain scans, like CT and head MRI scans, to help make a diagnosis.

What kind of therapy helps Alzheimer's? ›

People with Alzheimer's disease have a buildup of amyloid-beta plaques in the brain. The FDA has approved the drug aducanumab-avwa (Aduhelm) as the first therapy that targets and reduces these plaques. It's for people with early Alzheimer's disease.

Who cares for Alzheimer patients? ›

People with Alzheimer's disease and related dementias are usually cared for by family members or friends. The majority (80%) of people with Alzheimer's disease and related dementias are receiving care in their homes.

What is the difference between Alzheimer's and dementia? ›

While dementia is a general term, Alzheimer's disease is a specific brain disease. It is marked by symptoms of dementia that gradually get worse over time. Alzheimer's disease first affects the part of the brain associated with learning, so early symptoms often include changes in memory, thinking and reasoning skills.

What are dementia specialists called? ›

a doctor specialising in elderly care (a geriatrician) a doctor specialising in the brain and nervous system (a neurologist)

Where is the best Alzheimer's treatment? ›

Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, Mayo Clinic in Phoenix/Scottsdale, Arizona, and Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida, are ranked among the Best Hospitals for neurology and neurosurgery in the U.S. News & World Report Best Hospitals rankings.

What is best practice in dementia care? ›

Values that govern this modern approach, particularly when applied to dementia care, include choice, dignity, respect, purposeful living, and self-determination. The primary areas of emphasis are prioritizing the person rather than the task or disease, and framing care with the wants and needs of the recipient.

What deficiency causes Alzheimer's disease? ›

Recent meta-analyses confirm that low serum vitamin D concentrations are associated with prevalent Alzheimer disease (AD) dementia and cognitive impairment.

Is dementia genetic or hereditary? ›

Many people affected by dementia are concerned that they may inherit or pass on dementia. The majority of dementia is not inherited by children and grandchildren. In rarer types of dementia there may be a strong genetic link, but these are only a tiny proportion of overall cases of dementia.

What are 3 treatments for Alzheimer's? ›

Three cholinesterase inhibitors are commonly prescribed:
  • Donepezil (Aricept) is approved to treat all stages of the disease. It's taken once a day as a pill.
  • Galantamine (Razadyne) is approved to treat mild to moderate Alzheimer's. ...
  • Rivastigmine (Exelon) is approved for mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease.

How can you help someone with Alzheimer's or dementia? ›

10 Ways to Help a Family Living with Alzheimer's
  1. Educate yourself about Alzheimer's disease. ...
  2. Stay in touch. ...
  3. Be patient. ...
  4. Offer a shoulder to lean on. ...
  5. Engage the person with dementia in conversation. ...
  6. Offer to help the family with its to-do list. ...
  7. Engage family members in activities. ...
  8. Offer family members a reprieve.

What is the best diet for Alzheimer's? ›

Eat foods that are low in saturated fat, total fat and cholesterol, and high in fruits, vegetables and low-fat dairy. Consume whole grains, poultry, fish and nuts. Decrease your intake of fats, red meats, sweets, sugared beverages and sodium.

What stage of dementia is forgetting family members? ›

Stage 6. In stage 6 of dementia, a person may start forgetting the names of close loved ones and have little memory of recent events. Communication is severely disabled and delusions, compulsions, anxiety, and agitation may occur.

How do you make a dementia patient happy? ›

Do something personal.
  1. Give the person a hand massage with lotion.
  2. Brush his or her hair.
  3. Give the person a manicure.
  4. Take photos of the person and make a collage.
  5. Encourage the person to talk more about subjects they enjoy.
  6. Make a family tree posterboard.

Should you tell Alzheimer patients the truth? ›

You must also learn how to handle the day-to-day challenges of caring for a person with Alzheimer's disease. Most experts say that if the affected person asks you what's wrong with them, you should be honest. Knowing that the problem is a disease, not "insanity," is often a relief for the person affected.

Videos

1. Alzheimer's and Wandering - Professional Caregiver Webinar
(Caregiver Stress)
2. July 2022 Meeting of the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care, and Services | Part 3
(U.S. Department of Health and Human Services)
3. Living Well: Alzheimer's and Dementia Resources Workshop - 6/15/2021
(Plano Public Library)
4. Alzheimer's and Wandering - Professional Caregiver Webinar
(Caregiver Stress)
5. Accessibility and Community: Bringing Alzheimer’s and Dementia Resources to the Latinx Community
(Wisconsin Alzheimer's Disease Research Center)
6. Caring for Someone with Dementia - Professional Caregiver Webinar
(Caregiver Stress)
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