Help Alzheimer’s Sufferers Cope with Loss (2023)

Alzheimer’s disease is a devastating diagnosis, and as the disease progresses it becomes increasingly challenging for sufferers to manage the myriad of emotions and situations they encounter throughout the course of any given day. Thus, when an Alzheimer’s sufferer experiences a tremendous loss, such as the death of a spouse or loved one, it can seem like a monumental task for caregivers to help them cope with their grief.

The experience of grief and bereavement is unique to every individual and can depend largely on how far their disease has progressed. People in the earlier stages of dementia may have an easier time understanding the loss that has occurred and even retaining the information, with occasional bouts of forgetfulness.

Help Alzheimer’s Sufferers Cope with Loss (1)

Image via Flickr by Julie Jordan Scott

Caregivers of people in the later stages of Alzheimer’s disease or other dementia often struggle with communicating regarding the death of a loved one, fearing that the care recipient may not comprehend the loss or may soon forget after the conversation. In fact, this is a common occurrence, leaving caregivers to wonder whether they should remind the person they care for that their loved one has passed on when they speak of her repeatedly as though she is still living. Multiple experts have offered advice on handling these sensitive situations, but ultimately, caregivers must approach every situation individually based on the person’s cognitive status, previous behaviors and conversations, and the individual’s personality and behaviors.

It’s important to recognize that even if a person with Alzheimer’s disease seemingly does not comprehend the loss, they may exhibit common behaviors associated with grief and bereavement and may retain an understanding of what has occurred. Often, these people are able to communicate their understanding of the loss during lucid moments, while during periods of forgetfulness, they may speak of loved ones who have passed on as though they are still with us.

There is one certainty in helping an individual with Alzheimer’s disease cope with the loss of a loved one, and that is that it is most assuredly a challenging and complicated process. We’ve put together a comprehensive resource, including tips, information, and advice from a variety of reputable organizations and sources, to help caregivers navigate the complex maze of helping a person with Alzheimer’s cope with the death of a loved one.

Coping with the Range of Emotions in Alzheimer’s Caregiving

Caring for a person with Alzheimer’s disease can be particularly emotionally challenging, resulting in a range of emotions for both the caregiver and the care recipient. The following tips and resources provide helpful advice for coping with the myriad of emotions encountered by Alzheimer’s caregivers, particularly when facing loss.

Help Alzheimer’s Sufferers Cope with Loss (2)

Image via Flickr by Michael Havens

Caring for a person with Alzheimer’s disease comes with both challenges and rewards. This article outlines the challenges and rewards of caring for a person with Alzheimer’s disease and offers information about support resources for caregivers.

Behavior problems can be a very real concern. This article discusses things like wandering, aggressiveness, hallucinations, and difficulties with sleeping or eating, along with tips to help caregivers manage these issues.

(Video) Timing Is Everything - Coping with Grief Surrounding Alzheimer's and Dementia

Memory loss is one of the most common – and most frustrating – symptoms associated with the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease. This resource from WebMD offers tips for caregivers to help people with Alzheimer’s disease cope with memory loss.

There are some special considerations and tips for reducing challenges during day-to-day care. Whether you live with someone who is suffering from Alzheimer’s disease or caring for a person with Alzheimer’s who does not reside with you, this article provides helpful information to help you best care for a person suffering from Alzheimer’s disease. Likewise, this article offers helpful links to information on maintaining a sense of normalcy in day-to-day life.

Stress and anxiety are common for people with Alzheimer’s disease. These emotions are often attributable to frustration due to memory loss, a loss of ability to do things they could once do independently, and the overall experience of grieving for what has been lost in relationships and daily activities. This resource from the National Institute on Aging offers links to helpful information for managing stress and anxiety, coping with grief and feelings of loss, and more, for both caregivers and individuals suffering from Alzheimer’s disease.

Learning to recognize signs of frustration in yourself helps you to be proactive about managing your stress. This resource, from Caregiver.org, offers helpful scenarios and alternative statements to control self-doubt, frustration, and other emotions common among Alzheimer’s caregivers.

Understanding the Grieving Process and Stages of Grief

Before you can help a person with Alzheimer’s cope with the loss of a loved one, it’s important to understand how the grieving process works and the various stages of grief individuals typically experience. Still, the grieving process is unique to every individual, so be sure to respect individual differences.

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Image via Flickr by 30datgarmedanal

Extreme feelings of grief typically subside within six months following the loss of a loved one. However, some individuals may struggle for several years to resume a sense of normalcy. This article describes the general process of grief and complicated grief.

Bereavement is the state of grieving over the loss of a loved one. This resource from the American Cancer Society explains the difference between grief and bereavement as well as the various stages of grief.

Grief is typically thought of as having five stages: denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and acceptance. This article from Grief.com outlines the five stages of grief as conceptualized by Elizabeth Kubler-Ross.

Other models define grief as having seven stages, a similar model to the 5-stage model that breaks down some of the original five stages into more complex experiences. This article outlines the seven-stage model of grief.

The five stages of grief are universal and experienced by people from all corners of the world and from all walks of life. This article discusses the five stages of grief and explains how these emotions represent stages experienced by anyone experiencing a loss.

Understanding How Loss and Bereavement Affect a Person with Dementia

(Video) How to Care for Someone Living with Alzheimer's, Dementia or Memory Loss

When caring for a person with Alzheimer’s disease, it’s important to understand how various circumstances and events may impact them. The following resources and information are useful for gaining clarity on how loss and bereavement may impact the individual for whom you’re caring.

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Image via Flickr by Alan Cleaver

Every person’s experience will be unique. Not every person with Alzheimer’s handles grief and loss in the same way. This is true of all individuals, whether the person is suffering from Alzheimer’s disease or not. This article describes the importance of person-centered care to adapt to the individual’s needs.

“Bereavement at the death of a friend or relative with dementia is a unique and complex situation that everyone will cope with in their own way.” This article outlines the experiences of grief, loss, and bereavement that a person diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease may experience, both after their own diagnosis and following the death of a friend or loved one.

Every day is different following the death of a spouse or loved one for a person with Alzheimer’s disease. Not only is the grieving process different for each individual, but as Carol Bradley Bursack explains in this article at ElderCareLink, the grieving process and the emotions experienced can change from day to day.

It’s not uncommon for a person with Alzheimer’s disease or dementia to not recall the death of a loved one. In fact, some Alzheimer’s sufferers still speak as though their loved ones are living years following a death. This resource includes the perspectives and advice of several families and caregivers who have dealt with similar situations.

The reaction of a person with dementia to grief is largely affected by their cognitive understanding of what has happened to their loved one. For this reason, grief may be far more complicated for a person with Alzheimer’s disease or dementia than it may be for a healthy person free of diseases or illnesses affecting cognition.

The loss of a family pet can lead to substantial grief for a person with Alzheimer’s disease, as well. This article offers tips for helping a person with Alzheimer’s disease cope following the loss of a beloved pet.

Breaking the News and Communication Tips

Many times, caregivers are tasked with breaking the news of the passing of a loved one to a person suffering with Alzheimer’s disease. The following tips and resources provide valuable advice for having these initial sensitive conversations and communicating with people with Alzheimer’s disease following the recent passing of a loved one.

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Image via Flickr by Borya

Should you tell a person with Alzheimer’s disease about the death of a loved one? If so, who should be the person to communicate the news, and how should it be handled? These are just a few of the questions plaguing caregivers’ minds when a care recipient loses a loved one. This article addresses how to best answer these questions and handle the communication of bad news.

When the situation involves the passing of a spouse, telling the surviving spouse, even when that person has Alzheimer’s disease, is an absolute must. Carol Bradley Bursack shares her experience when placing her dad in foster care, while her mother, who had dementia, shared a room with him in the nursing home.

(Video) The Longest Loss: Alzheimer's Disease and Dementia

There are some strategies that can help a person with Alzheimer’s disease more easily take in new information, such as keeping the information as simple as possible or breaking it down into smaller bits of information or steps. This article offers some helpful tips for aiding a person with Alzheimer’s disease in taking in new information through context and various communication strategies.

Your approach to sharing the news and helping a person with Alzheimer’s disease cope with the passing of a loved one will vary based on how advanced the individual’s disease is. As this article points out, there are multiple stages of Alzheimer’s disease and dementia. A person in the earlier stages of Alzheimer’s disease may cope more readily with such a loss, while in some cases, the loss can complicate the individual’s disease progression.

A person with Alzheimer’s disease deserves the dignity of being told of the passing of a loved one. Regardless of how difficult the situation may be, many experts agree that any individual with Alzheimer’s disease has the same right to learn of the passing of a loved one. This article explains the position of one recognized expert on Alzheimer’s caregiving, Carol Bradley Bursack.

There are several tips and strategies to help caregivers communicate more effectively with a person with Alzheimer’s disease. This article outlines ten tips for communicating with a person with Alzheimer’s disease or dementia, such as getting the person’s attention first and asking simple, answerable questions.

Caregivers of persons with Alzheimer’s disease encounter many unique and challenging communication scenarios. This article covers many of the possible scenarios caregivers may face, along with tips for addressing these situations. One such scenario is how to handle it when a person with Alzheimer’s disease states and/or believes that a deceased loved one is not only living, but came to visit that day.

When communicating the death of a loved one to a person with Alzheimer’s disease, it’s recommended that only one person break the news to avoid confusion. This article offers helpful information and advice for communicating the death of a loved one to a person with Alzheimer’s disease or dementia.

Handling Forgetfulness When Caring for a Person with Alzheimer’s Disease

One of the biggest challenges faced by many Alzheimer’s caregivers following the loss of a loved one is that the care recipient may forget that their spouse, parent, or other loved one has passed. These situations prove particularly challenging for caregivers in determining how to best communicate throughout these conversations.

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Image via Flickr by Marjan Lavarevski

People with Alzheimer’s disease don’t always have to be grounded in reality. As this article points out, reminding a person with Alzheimer’s disease that her spouse or parent has passed away is also a reminder of the pain of that loss.

When the person you are caring for repeatedly forgets about their loved one’s passing and asks for him, it’s difficult to navigate these situations. This article offers some advice for finding the right balance between telling the person you’re caring for a lie and having to relive your own grief each time she asks about her loved one.

Sometimes, a “therapeutic lie” is acceptable, and may even be preferred in some cases. This discussion centers on the benefits of occasionally using this technique to avoid causing undue stress or pain for a person with Alzheimer’s disease.

Some experts advise against reminding a person with Alzheimer’s disease that a loved one has passed. This article outlines five things you should never say to an individual with Alzheimer’s disease, including reminding her that her loved one has passed on. As this article explains, if the person does not believe you, they may become angry with you; if they do believe you, they will experience grief and loss all over again. And ultimately, the information may not be retained, so you may encounter the same situation again tomorrow. However, this is dependent on the person as well as his disease process.

(Video) How to Talk to Someone With Dementia

Habilitation Therapy is an approach that gives the highest value to the well-being of the person suffering with Alzheimer’s disease. This approach, outlined in this resource, recognizes that whatever the individual correctly or incorrectly believes to be true is, in fact, the reality in which the individual is living. Habilitation Therapy approaches these situations by understanding what the person is experiencing and respecting it, never negating it.

How to Handle Bereavement Activities When Caring for a Person with Alzheimer’s Disease

In addition to the possibility that a person with Alzheimer’s disease may experience memory loss resulting in forgetfulness about a loved one’s passing, every Alzheimer’s sufferer is unique in how she experiences grief and handles bereavement. The following tips and resources offer helpful advice for coping with situations such as attending funerals and other bereavement activities.

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Image via Flickr by Arthur (Ted) LaBar

An Alzheimer’s sufferer may opt not to attend a loved one’s funeral. Again, every individual handles grief and loss differently. This resource contains helpful responses from Alzheimer’s caregivers surrounding the communication of the death of a loved one and how to handle situations, such as the individual choosing not to attend a funeral.

When determining whether a person with Alzheimer’s disease should attend the funeral of a loved one, there are several considerations to weigh. This article offers advice for handling different situations when a person has dementia, such as attending church and attendance at the funerals of loved ones.

Taking a person with Alzheimer’s disease to the funeral of a loved one is an individual choice based on behavior and cultural preferences, but can sometimes help the individual process the loss. This resource offers tips for communicating the death of a loved one to a person with Alzheimer’s disease and recommends activities and approaches that can help both you and the person for whom you are caring cope with the loss.

A person with Alzheimer’s disease or dementia may exhibit behaviors that demonstrate the pain of their loss, even though they don’t appear to have a cognitive understanding of the loss. As this article explains, it’s not uncommon for a person with Alzheimer’s disease to seemingly not comprehend that a loved one has passed, yet display common bereavement behaviors such as sleepiness, a lack of motivation, a lack of appetite, and other common symptoms of grief.

It can be helpful to redirect conversations following the death of a loved one to pleasant memories, playing music that brings back fond memories, or sharing stories about the person who has passed to help a person with Alzheimer’s cope with grief. This article offers several suggestions for easing the grieving process for a person with Alzheimer’s disease, as well as helpful insights on how a person with Alzheimer’s may experience grief.

While helping a person with Alzheimer’s disease cope with the death of a loved one is certainly not easy, it can be quite rewarding. When you employ strategies that help the person you’re caring for transition from a state of grief, despair, and possibly anger and frustration to one of comfort and nostalgia, it can help you feel accomplished as a caregiver as well as help you manage your own complicated emotions that accompany caring for a person with Alzheimer’s disease.

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(Video) Caregiver Training: Agitation and Anxiety | UCLA Alzheimer's and Dementia Care Program

FAQs

How do Alzheimer's patients cope with grief? ›

Ways to cope with grief and loss
  1. Face your feelings. ...
  2. Prepare to experience feelings of loss more than once. ...
  3. Claim the grieving process as your own. ...
  4. Talk with someone. ...
  5. Combat feelings of isolation and loneliness. ...
  6. Join a support group. ...
  7. Know that some people may not understand your grief. ...
  8. Accept yourself.

How do people with dementia deal with grief? ›

Grief Process

People with dementia who are grieving are often agitated and restless. They may sense that something is not right, something is missing. They may confuse one loss with another. A recent death may stimulate the memory of loss from childhood.

What are some memory tips and tricks for people with Alzheimer's? ›

Put sticky notes around the house with reminders for yourself. Label cupboards and drawers with words or pictures that describe their contents. Ask a friend or family member to call and remind you of important things you need to do during the day, like taking medication and going to appointments.

Can grief trigger Alzheimers? ›

The study found that individuals who experience partner bereavement were nearly 50% more likely to be diagnosed with dementia within three months after the bereavement, compared to those whose partners are still living.

What do you say to someone who has lost someone to Alzheimer's? ›

Let them know you recognize areas of cognition they still have. Let them know you will “be there” to step in with them in whatever areas they need help in. Let them know they can count on your friendship. Other sufferers don't recognize their own impairment and may resent the necessity of being cared for by others.

Why is Alzheimer's called the long goodbye? ›

Usually, near the end, they no longer even speak. Their body declines, but the pace of their cognitive decline is speedier. Usually, by the time someone with Alzheimer's disease dies, the traits, tendencies and abilities the person possessed have long since departed.

Can a person with dementia grieve? ›

After someone is diagnosed with dementia and as it progresses, they and the people close to them may have many different feelings, such as guilt, loss and grief. The person may also have feelings of loss and grief about their condition.

Should an Alzheimer's patient go to a funeral? ›

Taking a person with Alzheimer's disease to the funeral of a loved one is an individual choice based on behavior and cultural preferences, but can sometimes help the individual process the loss.

At what stage do dementia patients forget family members? ›

Stage 6. In stage 6 of dementia, a person may start forgetting the names of close loved ones and have little memory of recent events. Communication is severely disabled and delusions, compulsions, anxiety, and agitation may occur.

How can I help my elderly parent with memory loss? ›

When forgetfulness increases in loved ones, an adult child caregiver can help reduce the memory loss. Implementing routines, helping a parent consume healthy meals, relieving emotional stresses, increasing mental stimulation and adjusting medications go a long way in helping a parent's memory stay alert.

What are the best activities for Alzheimer's patients? ›

Do something personal.
  • Give the person a hand massage with lotion.
  • Brush his or her hair.
  • Give the person a manicure.
  • Take photos of the person and make a collage.
  • Encourage the person to talk more about subjects they enjoy.
  • Make a family tree posterboard.

Why do dementia patients forget family members? ›

People with dementia have lost the ability to retrieve memories, not just the memories themselves. Although people with healthy brains can take in hints and reminders, then locate and retrieve a memory, people experiencing dementia cannot.

Why the elderly can go downhill after the loss of their partner? ›

With the widowhood effect, older adults who have lost a spouse face an increased risk of dying compared to those whose spouses are living. Causes of the widowhood effect may include self-neglect, lack of a support network, and lifestyle changes that follow the death of a spouse.

How do caregivers cope with loss and grief? ›

Express your grief

Cry when you need to cry. Be angry when you feel angry. Don't suppress yourself or pretend to be stoic. While this can seem hard to do when focusing on the care of someone at the end of life, find safe outlets with a trusted friend, counselor, or someone from the hospice team.

How do you deal with anticipatory grief and ambiguous loss? ›

Loss and grief can take their toll, so self-care is extremely important. Exercise, meditation, nature, journaling, play and laughter can all help. We each have different balance points and tipping points, but we can usually sense when things are out of balance.

What to say to Alzheimer patients when they say they want to go home? ›

Reassure the person verbally, and possibly with arm touches or hand-holding if this feels appropriate. Let the person know that they are safe. It may help to provide reassurance that the person is still cared about. They may be living somewhere different from where they lived before, and need to know they're cared for.

What to say to someone who lost their mother to Alzheimer's? ›

At the end of the day, something as simple as “I'm so sorry for your loss” or “I'm so sad for you and your family, please accept my deepest condolences” is always appropriate.

What causes dementia patients to suddenly get worse? ›

Rapidly progressive dementias or RPDs are extremely rare, but can cause dementia to worsen over weeks and months. RPDs can be caused by complex medical conditions such as Autoimmune conditions, cancer, and neurodegenerative diseases – i.e diseases that damage the body's nervous systems.

What is ambiguous loss in dementia? ›

Ambiguous loss is a type of loss you feel when a person with dementia is physically here, but may not be mentally or emotionally present in the same way as before. This is very different from the loss and grief of sudden death, as an example, where you clearly know that the person is gone.

What happens when someone dies of Alzheimer's? ›

The way people with Alzheimer's disease die is different from person to person, but there's a basic pattern to the process. They slowly lose the ability to control basic body functions, such as eating, drinking, and toileting. After a while, their body shuts down. They can't move much on their own.

Why is it called the long goodbye? ›

They constantly feel that they have to give the best possible care to ensure their loved one's well-being. And sadly, it's the family who witnesses the patient slowly fading away, which has prompted many to use the sobriquet of “The Long Goodbye” for this disease.

What is anticipatory grief dementia? ›

Anticipatory grief describes the set of complex feelings experienced while anticipating an inevitable death ahead. You are grieving the loss of someone to illness, not to death, although the emotions can be just as intense. The instant a loved one is diagnosed with dementia you start to grieve.

Can emotional trauma trigger dementia? ›

Several studies have pointed out that a particularly traumatic event could enhance the risk of dementia.

Should you tell Alzheimer patients the truth? ›

Honesty isn't always the best policy when it comes to someone with Alzheimer's or dementia. That's because their brain may experience a different version of reality. Dementia damages the brain and causes progressive decline in the ability to understand and process information.

What should you not say to someone with dementia? ›

I'm going to discuss five of the most basic ones here: 1) Don't tell them they are wrong about something, 2) Don't argue with them, 3) Don't ask if they remember something, 4) Don't remind them that their spouse, parent or other loved one is dead, and 5) Don't bring up topics that may upset them.

What are the last stages of dementia before death? ›

Signs of the final stages of dementia include some of the following: Being unable to move around on one's own. Being unable to speak or make oneself understood. Eating problems such as difficulty swallowing.

How do family members cope with Alzheimer's? ›

10 Ways to Help a Family Living with Alzheimer's
  1. Educate yourself about Alzheimer's disease. ...
  2. Stay in touch. ...
  3. Be patient. ...
  4. Offer a shoulder to lean on. ...
  5. Engage the person with dementia in conversation. ...
  6. Offer to help the family with its to-do list. ...
  7. Engage family members in activities. ...
  8. Offer family members a reprieve.
Oct 23, 2019

What are the 4 A's of Alzheimer's symptoms? ›

The four A's of Alzheimer's disease are: amnesia, aphasia, apraxia, and agnosia. Amnesia. Amnesia, the most common sign of Alzheimer's disease, refers to loss of memory.

What is sundowning behavior? ›

They may experience sundowning—restlessness, agitation, irritability, or confusion that can begin or worsen as daylight begins to fade—often just when tired caregivers need a break. Sundowning can continue into the night, making it hard for people with Alzheimer's to fall asleep and stay in bed.

What are 5 extreme behavior changes found with FTD? ›

Behavioral changes

Loss of empathy and other interpersonal skills, such as having sensitivity to another's feelings. Lack of judgment. Loss of inhibition. Lack of interest (apathy), which can be mistaken for depression.

Should someone with Alzheimer's go to a funeral? ›

Taking a person with Alzheimer's disease to the funeral of a loved one is an individual choice based on behavior and cultural preferences, but can sometimes help the individual process the loss.

Should you tell someone with Alzheimer's that someone has died? ›

Tell the news as soon as possible. They will sense that something is wrong and need information to understand, even if just for that period of time. If you are too emotional to talk to them, find someone else — maybe a friend or healthcare professional.

Why the family of a client with dementia may feel loss grief and despair? ›

Family members may have to take on new tasks such as paying bills, legal paperwork etc. This may feel overwhelming. Adjusting to the changes that dementia brings is a process. It can affect us in many different ways – emotionally, mentally, physically, and spiritually.

What is grief dementia? ›

Feelings of grief when a person has dementia

It often involves strong feelings of sadness or distress, especially when the loss is significant. It is very personal and can affect people in many different ways, including: shock. helplessness or despair. social withdrawal (avoiding contact with others)

At what stage do dementia patients forget family members? ›

Stage 6. In stage 6 of dementia, a person may start forgetting the names of close loved ones and have little memory of recent events. Communication is severely disabled and delusions, compulsions, anxiety, and agitation may occur.

What causes dementia patients to suddenly get worse? ›

Rapidly progressive dementias or RPDs are extremely rare, but can cause dementia to worsen over weeks and months. RPDs can be caused by complex medical conditions such as Autoimmune conditions, cancer, and neurodegenerative diseases – i.e diseases that damage the body's nervous systems.

What should you not say to someone with dementia? ›

I'm going to discuss five of the most basic ones here: 1) Don't tell them they are wrong about something, 2) Don't argue with them, 3) Don't ask if they remember something, 4) Don't remind them that their spouse, parent or other loved one is dead, and 5) Don't bring up topics that may upset them.

When a person with dementia is asking to see someone who has died? ›

Sometimes hallucination symptoms manifest as seeing and talking to people who died long ago. Advanced damage to the brain in a person with dementia may cause such hallucinations. Your loved one may feel a deceased one's presence and have full conversations with them, even though they're not there.

What are the last stages of dementia before death? ›

Signs of the final stages of dementia include some of the following: Being unable to move around on one's own. Being unable to speak or make oneself understood. Eating problems such as difficulty swallowing.

How do caregivers cope with loss and grief? ›

Express your grief

Cry when you need to cry. Be angry when you feel angry. Don't suppress yourself or pretend to be stoic. While this can seem hard to do when focusing on the care of someone at the end of life, find safe outlets with a trusted friend, counselor, or someone from the hospice team.

Can emotional trauma trigger dementia? ›

Several studies have pointed out that a particularly traumatic event could enhance the risk of dementia.

How do you deal with anticipatory grief and ambiguous loss? ›

Loss and grief can take their toll, so self-care is extremely important. Exercise, meditation, nature, journaling, play and laughter can all help. We each have different balance points and tipping points, but we can usually sense when things are out of balance.

Can grief cause cognitive decline? ›

Grief and loss affect the brain and body in many different ways. They can cause changes in memory, behavior, sleep, and body function, affecting the immune system as well as the heart. It can also lead to cognitive effects, such as brain fog.

What is exaggerated grief? ›

Exaggerated grief is the exaggeration of the normal grief process, either through actions, words, or mental health. Exaggerated grief may include major psychiatric disorders that develop following a loss such a phobias as a result of hyper-grieving thoughts, actions, words, etc.

How do family members cope with Alzheimer's? ›

10 Ways to Help a Family Living with Alzheimer's
  1. Educate yourself about Alzheimer's disease. ...
  2. Stay in touch. ...
  3. Be patient. ...
  4. Offer a shoulder to lean on. ...
  5. Engage the person with dementia in conversation. ...
  6. Offer to help the family with its to-do list. ...
  7. Engage family members in activities. ...
  8. Offer family members a reprieve.
Oct 23, 2019

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